Food Glossary

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Wasabi Also known as Japanese horseradish. This is a pungent paste made from the knobbly green root of the wasabi, a plant native to Japan. it is used as a condiment with seafoods and is extremely hot, so use sparingly. Online Recipes - Wasabi
Water chestnuts Walnut sized, brown bulb. Must be peeled before use. It is sweet and has a crisp texture similar to apples. Canned water chestnuts are peeled and boiled. They will keep covered with fresh water, in the refrigerator, for about 2 weeks. Change the water once a week. Online Recipes - Water Chestnuts
Watercress Introduced into Asia by the British, its peppery flavor is added to soups and steamed vegetables in Chinese cooking, and it is used in salads in Thailand, Laos and Vietnam. Also use as a garnish in Japan.  
White sesame seeds See Sesame seeds (white) Online Recipes - White Sesame Seeds
Wine lees A thick fermented wine paste. Light miso (Japanese soybean paste) can be used as a substitute.  
Wine, Shaohsing or rice Chinese rice wine used for drinking or cooking. Dry sherry may be used as a substitute in cooking.  
Winter melon (tung gwa) A large light green melon with a white powdery surface resembling a water melon. The inside is white with seeds in the center. Usually sold in sections. Peel hard skin and discard seeds. Slice melon and use in soups.  
Wok The wok is a metal pan with sloping sides and a rounded or flat bottom. The 35cm (14 in) wok is the best size for home use.  
Won tons Fresh squares of noodle dough. Usually comes in one pound packages. Thickness varies from thick to thin. Fresh won tons will keep in the refrigerator for a week. Can be frozen, wrapped air tight, for about 2 months. Use thick wrappers for deep-fried won tons. Thin wrappers are better for soups.  
Wood ears See cloud ears Online Recipes  - Wood Ears ( Cloud Ears )

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