Serving and Eating a Sri Lankan Meal

Serving and Eating a Sri Lankan Meal

In Sri Lanka, the staple food of the people is rice and this has been part of of all the Sri Lankan communities. When enquiring if one has eaten a meal, the literal translation of the question as asked within the Sinhalese language will be 'Have you eaten your rice?' And all over the Sri Lankan island the midday meal is without a doubt rice and curry, the typical Sinhalese style.

For such a meal, all the dishes are placed on the table simultaneously - rice, fish and meat curries, soup, vegetables and accompaniments. It is absolutely proper to have a serving of everything on your own plate at the same time. Soup may be ladled over the rice or sipped from the cup in between mouthfuls of food, however it is not necessarily the initial course. While the finest method to savor such a meal is to eat using the fingers just like the people of the nation do, dessertspoon and fork are generally accepted these days apart from on special functions for instance the Sinhalese New Year, when everyone goes traditional and eats using their fingers.

Desserts are unknown apart from festive events, and the meal normally concludes with a few of the delicious fresh fruit so abundant on the Sri Lankan island: mangoes of no less than a dozen various types; pawpaws so sweet they appear to have been macerated in honey; bananas in even more varieties than mangoes; mangosteens and rambutan in season; avocados which can be served with cream and sugar, certainly not in a salad as they are served in the western world; and the huge, ungainly jack fruit, spiky green externally and the size of a big watermelon, containing large, golden, fleshy seed pods of vast sweetness and exceptional flavor.

Curries, that are undoubtedly a part of each meal, are not always categorized based on the primary ingredients, but based on the type of spicing, the technique of cooking, or the color which, to the initiate, conveys much more than simply whether a curry is white, red or black. White curries use coconut milk and therefore are typically mild and have lots of liquid so they double as soups. Red curries use few spices and a lots of chili powder or ground chilies providing the curry its dazzling color and red hot taste. In Sri Lanka it really is quite prevalent to have up to thirty big dried red chilies to spice a dish for 6-8 individuals. Unless you are familiar with spices on a great scale, tread warily. Use some chili for taste and paprika to attain the preferred color. Discretion is in no way the greater part of valor!

Black curries would be the most common curries in Sri Lanka. They acquire dark color because of the cilantro, cumin and fennel are roasted until a vibrant coffee brown. This dark-roasting brings about nuances of taste in a simple and totally enjoyable way, making the cooking of this little Sri Lankan island highly unique.

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