About Kale

Kale

Kale is the name used for a variety of green leafed vegetable of the brassica family. Most kales have thick stems and robust leaves that do not form a head. Many kales have curly leaves, which are the variety most commonly eaten. Large coarse-leafed kales are grown for cattle and sheep feeds.

History : Kale is thought to be one of the first cultivated brassicas. Colewort, the wild ancestor, still grows along the coasts of western Europe.

Varieties -

Collards : Collards, or collard greens, are a popular green vegetable in the southern United States. They are grown in summer and autumn for harvesting in the spring and are a good source of vitamin A.

Curly Kale : With its crimped, curly leaves, this is the most commonly available kale, although even this can be quite hard to come by. If you are a big fan and don't grow your own, try farm shops in early spring.

Purple or Silver Kale : This is an ornamental variety, and is grown almost exclusively for display.

Preparing and Cooking : Kale is probably the strongest tasting of the brassicas and is best cooked simply, paired with a bland-flavored vegetable, such as potatoes. To prepare, break the leaves from the stalk and then cut out any thick stalk from the leaf. This can then be rolled and sliced or cooked whole. Boil the leaves in a little salted water for 3-5 minutes until tender. Owing to its robust nature, kale is frequently teamed with fairly hot spices and is consequently popular n many Indian dishes.

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