Apples - About the Nutrients

Apples - About the Nutrients

Apples are a high-fiber fruit with insoluble cellulose and lignin in the peel and soluble pectins in the flesh. Their most important vitamin is vitamin C. One fresh apple of 2.5 inches in diameter, eaten with the skin, has about 3 g dietary fiber and 8 mg vitamin C. The sour taste of all immature apples and some varieties, even when ripe, comes from the acid. As an apple ripens, the amount of acid declines and the apple becomes sweeter.

Apples seeds contain amygdalins, a naturally occurring cyanide/sugar compound that degrades into hydrogen cyanide. While accidentally swallowing an apple seed once in a while is not a serious hazard for an adult, cases of human poisoning after eating apple seeds have been reported, and swallowing only a few seeds may be lethal for a child.

The most nutritious way to serve this fruit is when it is fresh and unpared. This will take advantage of the fiber in the peel and preserve the vitamin C, which is destroyed by the heat of cooking.

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