Cooking with Shrimps

Types of shrimps used in cooking

Shrimps can be either seawater or farm-raised. Seawater shrimps naturally exist in bays, estuaries, and oceans. Farm-raised shrimps are grown in a more controlled environment. Seawater shrimps are generally caught by bottom trawling, dragging the nets along the sea bottom. Much of the shrimps sold in restaurants and supermarkets today is cultivated in large factory-style shrimp farms carved out of the coastal landscape.

Most domestic seawater shrimps are caught in deep waters ranging from 60 - 250 feet where the ocean waters are clean and free of pollutants. Seawater shrimps typically grows larger because of more swimming, which creates more muscle. They are known for an extra firm texture and a slightly sweet flavor. Farm-raised shrimps grow in a controlled environment. In general, cooked seawater or farmed white shrimp have flesh with pink skin tones. Seawater shrimp have a sweet taste and firm, almost "crunchy" meat. Farm-raised shrimps have a slightly milder flavor, and depending upon growing conditions, may have a less firm texture. Shrimp in the seawater feed on crustaceans and seaweed, which enrich their flavor and strengthen their shells. Plus, the seawater ones are free swimmers which firms up their flesh.

Most people only want seawater shrimps because farm-raised shrimps have absolutely no flavor. Seawater shrimps are safe to eat, untainted, cleaner, have a firmer flesh and taste better than the almost bland flavor of imported, farm-raised shrimps. If you have a choice, you should use seawater shrimps and not farm raised shrimps.

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