Sauteing Vegetables

How to saute vegetables

Sautéing is a high-heat cooking method that concentrates and enhances the flavor of vegetables by evaporating their water and caramelizing them so that they are savory and flavorful on the outside and meltingly tender on the inside. The fat you use - butter, oil or rendered animal fat - adds additional flavor.

Small vegetables or vegetable slices and pieces are sautéed by tossing in a wide pan with sloping sides. Tossing is better than stirring because it's gentler and even delicate stirring can crush some vegetables as they cook. Tossing can be intimidating at first, but with a little experience (tossing dried beans is good practice), it becomes second nature and is easier than stirring. Vegetable pieces that are too large to toss - such as potatoes, long slices of zucchini or eggplant - are sautéed in a single layer until browned, then turned with a pair of tongs or a spatula. Watery vegetables such as sliced tomatoes may also be coated with flour or a breading mixture before sautéing. The coating absorbs the moisture given off by the vegetable as it cooks and helps it brown; it also adds flavor and keeps the vegetable from absorbing fat.

More Cooking Guide

Visitors Currently Online: 8