About Parships

About Parsnips

A member of the parsley family, parsnips are a white root vegetable with a pleasantly sweet flavor. They are often boiled and mashed like potatoes or in combination with them. When choosing, look for parsnips that are about 8" to 10" in length, and avoid those that look limp or spotted. When left to grow, parsnips can reach up to 20" in length. These larger roots have a stronger flavor and more fibrous texture with a woody center. To use larger parsnips, cut out the fibrous centers before using.

To store parsnips, place them in a perforated bag and refrigerate up to 2 weeks. The longer you keep parsnips, the sweeter they will get. Trim off any green growth at the top of the root before using. Parsnips can be used in soups and stews. However, they will turn mushy when overcooked, so add them to soups, stews, or vegetables sautes during the last 10 minutes of cooking.

Peel parsnips after cooking them. Almost 50 percent of the nutrients in parsnips are water-soluble, meaning that they will leach out during cooking. Also, the majority of the flavor in parsnips is found just beneath the skin, so you don't want that to leach out either. Steam parsnips whole or in large chunks until tender, then scrape or peel away the skin. Like carrots, well-scrubbed fresh parsnips may not need peeling.

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